Aligning itself with the recommendations of its First Committee (Disarmament and International Security), the General Assembly adopted 63 resolutions and 4 decisions today, bringing to a close its consideration of the current arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation issues on its agenda alongside emerging cybersecurity and information technology threats.
Renewing the determination of all States to take collective action towards ridding the planet of atomic bombs, the Assembly, by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 4 against (China, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Syria), with 23 abstentions, adopted the resolution “United action with renewed determination towards the total elimination of nuclear weapons”, which endeavours to ease international tensions and strengthen trust between States.
Prior to passing the resolution as a whole, the Assembly decided, by separate recorded votes, to retain a total of 13 paragraphs. These included provisions which, among other things, expressed deep concern at the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons use and urged all States possessing them to undertake all efforts to address the risks of unintended detonations.
Expressing its strong conviction that those responsible for the use of chemical weapons must be held accountable, the Assembly adopted as a whole the resolution “Implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction” by a recorded vote of 152 in favour to 7 against (Cambodia, China, Iran, Nicaragua, Russian Federation, Syria, Zimbabwe), with 22 abstentions.
Beforehand, the Assembly decided, by recorded vote, to retain five paragraphs, including preambular paragraph 4, in which it re-emphasized its unequivocal support for the decision of the Director General of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to continue the mission to establish the facts surrounding the allegations of the use of chemical weapons, including toxic chemicals, for hostile purposes in Syria.
Seeking to build further support for the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons signed on 7 July 2017, the Assembly adopted, by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 41 against, with 16 abstentions, a new, eponymous resolution that called upon all States that have not yet done so to sign, ratify, accept, approve or accede to the Treaty at the earliest possible date.
Adopting a resolution on the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use of Nuclear Weapons, by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 50 against, with 13 abstentions, the Assembly reiterated its request to the Conference on Disarmament to commence negotiations to reach agreement on an international instrument prohibiting the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons under any circumstances.
By a resolution adopted, without a vote, on the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament, the Assembly called upon Member States to remain vigilant in understanding new and emerging developments. By its provisions, the Assembly underline the importance of Member States engaging with experts from industry, the research community and civil society in addressing this challenge. It also requested that the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) convene, from voluntary contributions, a one-day informal seminar in Geneva in 2019 to facilitate dialogue among stakeholders on current developments.
By separate recorded votes, it adopted the following decisions on further practical measures for the prevention of an arms race in outer space; missiles; and nuclear disarmament verification. Also by separate recorded votes, it adopted resolutions on the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons; nuclear disarmament; decreasing the operational readiness of nuclear weapons systems; Universal Declaration on the Achievement of a Nuclear-Weapon-Free-World; the risk of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East; establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the region of the Middle East; and on convening of the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament.
Due to programme budget implications, the Assembly deferred action on two new draft resolutions: “Advancing Responsible State Behaviour in Cyberspace in the Context of International Security”, tabled by the United States and “Convening a Conference on the Establishment of a Middle East Zone Free of Nuclear Weapons and other Weapons of Mass Destruction”, presented by Egypt.
Addressing some of the threats posed by conventional weapons, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, resolutions on the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects; information on confidence-building measures; assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them; and on countering the threat posed by improvised explosive devices.
Taking up other texts contained in the First Committee report on general and complete disarmament, the Assembly adopted, by separate recorded votes, resolutions on: conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels; Arms Trade Treaty; effects of the use of armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium; observance follow-up to the 2013 high-level meeting of the General Assembly on nuclear disarmament; promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation; measures to uphold the authority of the 1925 Geneva Protocol; The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation; implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions; reducing nuclear danger; implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on Their Destruction.
Also by separate recorded votes, it adopted the following resolutions: preventing and combating illicit brokering activities; follow-up to the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice on the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons; treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices; ethical imperatives for a nuclear-weapon-free world; towards a nuclear-weapon-free world: accelerating the implementation of nuclear disarmament commitments; Fourth Conference of Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones and Mongolia, 2020; and transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities.
Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the following resolutions: regional disarmament; regional confidence-building measures: activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa; confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context; relationship between disarmament and development; observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control; measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction; Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapon-free status; women, disarmament, non-proliferation and arms control; consolidation of peace through practical disarmament measures; Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia; disarmament and non-proliferation education; and preventing the acquisition by terrorists of radioactive sources.
Taking up the First Committee report on the “Review and implementation of the Concluding Document of the Twelfth Special Session of the General Assembly”, it adopted, without a vote, resolutions on the United Nations disarmament fellowship, training and advisory services; United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa; United Nations Disarmament Information Programme; and United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament.
The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, the following resolutions on an African Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone Treaty; prevention of an arms race in outer space and no first placement of weapons in outer space, conclusion of effective international arrangements to assure non-nuclear-weapon States against the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons; Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects; strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region; Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty; and the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction.
In addition, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, the Committee’s reports on the Conference on Disarmament and the Disarmament Commission. It also adopted, without a vote, the decision on the maintenance of international security in South-Eastern Europe.
As part of its revitalization efforts, the Assembly adopted its provisional programme of work and timetable of the First Committee for 2019.
The General Assembly will meet again at 10 a.m. on Thursday, 6 December, to discuss the situation in Afghanistan.
Action on Draft Resolutions
MUNA ZAWANI MOHAMMAD IDRIS (Brunei Darussalam), Committee Rapporteur, introduced the reports of the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security), noting that 31 formal meetings took place during the current session to consider its 19 agenda items and approve a total of 68 draft texts. A total of 135 delegations made statements during the general debate, compared with 131 in 2017, with 344 interventions made, compared with 312 interventions in the previous session, showing an upward trend in participation.
The Assembly then considered the reports, first taking note of the report “Reduction of military budgets” (document A/73/502), which contained no draft resolutions or decisions.
It then considered the report “African Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone Treaty” (document A/73/503), containing an eponymous draft resolution. Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted that text, by which it called upon African States that have not yet done so to sign and ratify the African Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Pelindaba) as soon as possible. It also called upon African States parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons that have not yet done so to conclude comprehensive safeguards agreements with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).
Turning to the report “Maintenance of international security — good-neighbourliness, stability and development in South-Eastern Europe” (document A/73/504), it adopted, without a vote, an eponymous draft decision contained therein, which decided to include the topic in the provisional agenda of the Assembly’s seventy-fifth session.
The Assembly then took up the report “Developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security” (document A/73/505), containing two draft resolutions.
It first deferred action on draft resolution II on “Advancing responsible State behaviour in cyberspace in the context of international security” pending a review of budget implications by the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary). By provisions of draft resolution II, the Assembly would request the Secretary General, with the assistance of a group of governmental experts to be established in 2019 on the basis of equitable geographical representation, to continue to study possible cooperative measures to address existing and potential threats, including norms, rules and principles of the responsible behaviour of States. The Assembly would also request the Secretary-General to submit a report on the study’s results at the Assembly’s seventy-sixth session. The related draft resolution “Advancing responsible State behaviour in cyberspace in the context of international security: Programme budget implications” (document A/C.1/73/L.72) provided details on additional resource requirements of $206,700 for 2019 and $763,800 and $325,100 in 2020 and 2021, respectively, in support of meetings of the group of governmental experts.
The Assembly then adopted draft resolution I on “Developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security”, by a recorded vote of 119 in favour to 46 against, with 14 abstentions. In doing so, the Assembly decided to convene in 2019 an open-ended working group acting on a consensus to further develop rules norms and principles of responsible behaviour of States and ways to implement them. It further decided that the working group would, among other things, study existing and potential threats and possible measures to address them and submit a report to the Assembly at its seventy-fifth session.
The Assembly then turned to the report “Establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the region of the Middle East” (document A/73/506), containing an eponymous draft resolution. By a recorded vote of 171 to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 5 abstentions (Cameroon, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Tuvalu, United Kingdom), the Assembly adopted that draft, by which it urged all parties directly concerned seriously to consider taking the practical and urgent steps required for the implementation of the proposal to establish such a zone. The Assembly also invited the countries concerned to adhere to the Non-Proliferation Treaty.
Next, the Assembly turned to the report “Conclusion of effective international arrangements to assure non-nuclear-weapon States against the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons” (document A/73/507), containing an eponymous draft resolution. By a recorded vote of 125 in favour to none against, with 58 abstentions, the Assembly adopted the draft, which appealed to all States, especially nuclear-weapon States, to work actively towards an early agreement on a common approach and, in particular, on a common formula that could be included in an international instrument of a legally binding character. The Assembly also recommended that further intensive efforts be devoted to the search for such a common approach or formula and that various alternative approaches, including those considered in the Conference on Disarmament, be further explored in order to overcome difficulties.
Next, the Assembly took up the report “Prevention of an arms race in outer space” (document A/73/508), which contained two draft resolutions and one draft decision. The Assembly first adopted, by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with no abstentions, draft resolution I on “Prevention of an arms race in outer space”, calling upon all States, in particular those with major space capabilities, to contribute actively to the objective of the peaceful use of that sphere and refrain from actions contrary to this goal.
By a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 12 against, with 40 abstentions, it adopted draft resolution II on “No first placement of weapons in outer space”. By the draft’s provisions, the Assembly urged for an early commencement of substantive work based on the updated draft treaty on the prevention of the placement of weapons in outer space and of the threat or use of force against outer space objects, introduced by China and the Russian Federation at the Conference on Disarmament in 2008.
The Assembly then adopted the draft decision “Further practical measures for the prevention of an arms race in outer space”, by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United States, Ukraine), with 48 abstentions. In doing so, the Assembly welcomed the commencement of the work of the group of governmental experts tasked with considering and making recommendations on substantial elements of an international legally binding instrument on the prevention of an arms race in outer space, including, inter alia, on the prevention of the placement of weapons in this realm.
Next, the Assembly turned to the report “Role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament” (document A/73/509), adopting, without a vote, the eponymous draft decision contained therein. By its provisions, the Assembly called upon Member States to remain vigilant in understanding new and emerging developments in science and technology that could imperil international security, and underlines the importance of Member States engaging with experts from industry, the research community and civil society in addressing this challenge. It also requested that the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) convene, from voluntary contributions, a one-day informal seminar in Geneva in 2019 to facilitate dialogue among stakeholders on current developments.
The Assembly then took up the report “General and complete disarmament” (document A/73/510), containing 40 draft resolutions and 2 draft decisions. Acting without a vote, it adopted draft resolution I on “Regional disarmament”, calling upon States to conclude agreements, wherever possible, for nuclear non-proliferation, disarmament and confidence-building measures at regional and subregional levels.
The Assembly then turned to draft resolution II “Conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels”, first deciding, by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 2 against (India, Russian Federation), with 43 abstentions, to retain operative paragraph 2. By this provision, the Assembly requested the Conference on Disarmament to consider the formulation of principles that could serve as a framework for regional agreements.
By a recorded vote of 179 in favour to 1 against (India), with 3 abstentions (Bhutan, Russian Federation, Rwanda), the Assembly adopted draft resolution II as a whole, deciding to give urgent consideration to the issues involved in conventional arms control at regional and subregional levels.
The Assembly adopted, without a vote, draft resolution III on “Confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context”. In doing so, the Assembly called upon Member States to refrain from the use or threat of use of force, in line with the principles of the Charter of the United Nations and reaffirm the ways and means of implementing confidence- and security-building measures set out in the Disarmament Commission’s report on its 1993 session.
It then took up draft resolution IV on “The Arms Trade Treaty” (document A/C.1/73/L.8/Rev.1), which would have the Assembly stress the vital importance of the full and effective implementation of and compliance with all provisions of the Treaty by States parties, and urges the States parties to meet their obligations under the Treaty, thereby contributing to international and regional peace, security and stability, to the reduction of human suffering and to the promotion of cooperation, transparency and responsible action.
Prior to taking action on the draft text as a whole, the Assembly held a separate recorded vote on three paragraphs. By a recorded vote of 158 in favour to none against, with 16 abstentions, it decided to retain preambular paragraph 8, by which the Assembly took note of the Secretary-General’s disarmament agenda, Securing Our Common Future: An Agenda for Disarmament, and particularly the section titled “Disarmament that saves lives”. By a recorded vote of 138 in favour to none against, with 33 abstentions, it decided to retain operative paragraph 4, calling upon all States that have not yet done so to ratify, accept, approve or accede to the Treaty, according to their respective constitutional processes, in order to achieve its universalization.
The Assembly also decided to retain operative paragraph 9, by a recorded vote of 134 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 35 abstentions. In doing so, it recognized the added value of the adoption in June 2018 of the report of the third United Nations Conference to Review Progress Made in the Implementation of the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects, including the annexed outcome document, and acknowledge synergies between this instrument and the Arms Trade Treaty. It then adopted draft resolution IV as a whole, by a recorded vote of 151 in favour to none against, with 29 abstentions.
Without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution V on “Relationship between disarmament and development”, urging the international community to devote part of the resources made available by the implementation of disarmament and arms limitation agreements to economic and social development, with a view to reducing the ever-widening gap between developed and developing countries.
By a recorded vote of 151 in favour to 4 against (France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 25 abstentions, the Assembly then adopted draft resolution VI on “Effects of the use of armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium”, requesting the Secretary-General to ask relevant international organizations to update and complete their research on the effects on human health and the environment. The Assembly also invited Member States that have used armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium in armed conflicts to provide the affected States with information about the location of the areas of use and the amounts used to facilitate the assessment and clearance of such areas.
Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution VII on “Observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control”. By its terms, the Assembly called upon States to adopt unilateral, bilateral, regional and multilateral measures so as to contribute to ensuring the application of scientific and technological progress within the framework of international security, disarmament and other related spheres, without detriment to the environment or to its effective contribution to attaining sustainable development.
The Assembly turned next to draft resolution VIII on “Follow-up to the 2013 high-level meeting of the General Assembly on nuclear disarmament”. By its terms, the Assembly would call for the urgent commencement of negotiations in the Conference on Disarmament on effective nuclear disarmament measures to achieve their total elimination and decide to convene, in New York, a United Nations high-level international conference on nuclear disarmament to review the progress made.
First, the Assembly decided, by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 19 against, with 23 abstentions, to retain preambular paragraph 12 of the draft, which notes the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons on 7 July 2017 at the United Nations conference to negotiate a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination. The Assembly then adopted the draft as a whole, by a recorded vote of 143 in favour to 27 against, with 14 abstentions.
By a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 4 against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 52 abstentions, the Assembly adopted draft resolution IX on “Promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation” and urged the participation of all interested States in multilateral negotiations on arms regulation, non-proliferation and disarmament in a non-discriminatory and transparent manner.
The Assembly, by a recorded vote of 178 in favour, to none against, with 4 abstentions (France, Israel, Papua New Guinea, United States), also adopted draft resolution X on “Convening of the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament”. In doing so, it welcomed the adoption by consensus of the recommendations on the objectives and agenda of the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament by the open-ended working group on that matter.
By a recorded vote of 181 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions (Israel, United States), it adopted draft resolution XI on “Measures to uphold the authority of the 1925 Geneva Protocol”. By the draft’s provisions, the Assembly renewed its previous call to all States to observe strictly the principles and objectives of the Protocol for the Prohibition of the Use in War of Asphyxiating, Poisonous or Other Gases, and of Bacteriological Methods of Warfare and called upon those States that continue to maintain reservations to the 1925 Geneva Protocol to withdraw them.
Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XII on “Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapons-free status” (document A/C.1/73/L.19). In doing so, it invited Member States to continue to cooperate with Mongolia in taking the measures necessary to consolidate and strengthen its independence, sovereignty, territorial integrity and nuclear-weapon-free status.
The Assembly then took action on draft resolution XIII on “Implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction”, taking separate recorded votes to retain five paragraphs. By a recorded vote of 134 in favour to 7 against (Belarus, Cambodia, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Iran, Syria, Russian Federation, Zimbabwe), with 25 abstentions, it decided to retain preambular paragraph 4. By its provisions, the Assembly re-emphasized its unequivocal support for the decision of the Director General of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to continue the mission to establish the facts surrounding the allegations of the use of chemical weapons, including toxic chemicals, for hostile purposes in Syria.
It decided to retain, by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 13 against, with 26 abstentions, operative paragraph 2. By its conditions, the Assembly condemned in the strongest possible terms that chemical weapons have since 2012 been used in Iraq, Malaysia, Syria and the United Kingdom, including as reported by the OPCW-United Nations Joint Investigative Mechanism in its reports of 24 August 2016 and 21 October 2016, and demanded that the perpetrators immediately desist from any further use of chemical weapons. The Assembly, by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 13 against, with 30 abstentions, decided to retain operative paragraph 3. In doing so, it noted with great concern the fact-finding mission reports regarding alleged incidents in Ltamenah and Saraqib and an interim report regarding the incident alleged use of toxic chemicals as a weapon in Douma.
Deciding to retain operative paragraph 4 by a recorded vote of 112 in favour to 18 against, with 35 abstentions, the Assembly recalled the adoption in June of the decision of the fourth Special Session of the Conference of the States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention on addressing the threat from chemical weapons use and stressed importance of its implementation. By a recorded vote of 110 in favour to 15 against, with 38 abstentions, the Assembly decided to retain operative paragraph 16. Doing so, the Assembly expressed grave concern that despite the verified destruction of all 27 chemical weapons production facilities declared by Syria, the Technical Secretariat cannot fully verify that Syria has submitted a declaration that can be considered accurate and complete in accordance with the Convention.
Finally, by a recorded vote of 152 in favour to 7 against (Cambodia, China, Iran, Nicaragua, Russian Federation, Syria, Zimbabwe), with 22 abstentions, the Assembly adopted the text as a whole and reaffirmed its condemnation in the strongest possible terms of the use of chemical weapons by anyone under any circumstances. It further emphasized that any use of chemical weapons anywhere, at any time, by anyone, under any circumstances is unacceptable and is and would be a violation of international law and expressed its strong conviction that those individuals responsible for the use of chemical weapons must and should be held accountable.
Next, the Assembly took up draft resolution XIV on “Women, disarmament, non-proliferation and arms control”. The Assembly first decided, by a recorded vote of 149 in favour to none against, with 23 abstentions, to retain preambular paragraph 10 and recalled the entry into force of the Arms Trade Treaty and therefore encouraged States parties to fully implement all the provisions of the Treaty, including the provisions on serious acts of gender-based violence and on violence against children. Without a vote, it then adopted the draft resolution as a whole and urged Member States to support and strengthen the effective participation of women in organizations in the field of disarmament at local, national, subregional and regional levels.
By a recorded vote of 142 in favour to 15 against, with 26 abstentions, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XV on “Humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons” and stressed that it is in the interest of the very survival of humanity that such armaments are never be used again. It also emphasized that the only way to guarantee that nuclear weapons will never be used again is their total elimination.
It adopted, by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 41 against, with 16 abstentions, draft resolution XVI on the “Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons”. By the draft’s provisions, the General Assembly welcomed the adoption of the instrument on 7 July 2017 and called upon all States that have not yet done so to sign, ratify, accept, approve or accede to the Treaty at the earliest possible date.
It then adopted draft resolution XVII on “The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation” by a recorded vote of 171 in favour to 1 against (Iran), with 12 abstentions. By the text, the Assembly invited all States that have not yet subscribed to the Code of Conduct, in particular those possessing space launch vehicle and ballistic missile capabilities and those developing corresponding national programmes, to do so, bearing in mind the right to use space for peaceful purposes.
The Assembly then took up draft resolution XVIII on “Nuclear disarmament”, holding separate recorded votes to retain two paragraphs. By a recorded vote of 116 in favour to 38 against, with 15 abstentions, it decided to retain preambular paragraph 32 and welcomed the successful adoption of the Treaty. It decided to retain operative paragraph 16, by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 2 against (Pakistan, Russian Federation), with 6 abstentions (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, France, Israel, Marshall Islands, United Kingdom, United States), and called for the immediate commencement of negotiations in the Conference on Disarmament on a non-discriminatory, multilateral and internationally and effectively verifiable treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices.
Taking up draft resolution XVIII as a whole, the Assembly adopted it by a recorded vote of 125 in favour to 40 against, with 18 abstentions. In doing so, it called upon nuclear-weapon States to agree on an internationally and legally binding instrument on a joint undertaking not to be the first to use nuclear weapons. It further urged nuclear-weapon States to carry out further reductions of non-strategic arsenals.
Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XIX on “Information on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms” and welcomed all relevant measures already undertaken by Member States and encouraged them to continue to adopt and apply them.
Also without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XX on “Assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them”. By the text, the Assembly commended the United Nations and international, regional and other organizations for their assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them.
The Assembly then turned to draft resolution XXI on “Consolidation of peace through practical disarmament measures” and decided to retain, by a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 2 against(Israel, United States), with 7 abstentions (Bolivia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Iran, Nicaragua, Syria, Venezuela), preambular paragraph 9. By its provisions, the Assembly welcomed the report of the third United Nations Conference to Review Progress Made in the Implementation of the Programme of Action on Small Arms, which underlined the importance of the instrument’s effective implementation for attaining Goal 16 and target 16.4 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The Assembly also called for the further strengthening of international cooperation and assistance for the implementation of the Programme of Action and the International Tracing Instrument.
It then adopted, without a vote, draft resolution XXI as a whole. By its provisions, the Assembly welcomed the synergies within the multi-stakeholder process, including Governments, the United Nations system, regional, subregional and non-governmental organizations, in support of practical disarmament measures and the Programme of Action on Small Arms.
The Assembly then took up draft resolution XXII on “Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions” (document A/C.1/73/L.39). Prior to taking up the draft as a whole, the Assembly decided to retain preambular paragraph 14, by a recorded vote of 153 in favour to none against, with 18 abstentions. In doing so, it took note of the Secretary-General’s new disarmament agenda.
It then, by a recorded vote of 144 in favour, to 1 against (Zimbabwe), with 38 abstentions, adopted the draft resolution as a whole and stressed the importance of the full implementation of and compliance with the Convention on Cluster Munitions and expressed strong concern regarding recent allegations, reports or documented evidence of the use of cluster munitions in different parts of the world. The Assembly also urged all States parties to provide the Secretary-General with complete and timely information as required by the instrument in order to promote transparency and compliance with the Convention.
Next, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, draft resolution XXIII on “Measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction” and urged all Member States to take and strengthen national measures, as appropriate, to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction, their means of delivery and materials and technologies related to their manufacture. It also requested the Secretary-General to compile a report on measures already taken by international organizations on issues relating to the linkage between the fight against terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.
By a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 49 against, with 11 abstentions, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XXIV on “Reducing nuclear danger”. By the draft’s terms, the Assembly called for a review of nuclear doctrines and, in this context, for immediate and urgent steps to reduce the risks of unintentional and accidental use of nuclear weapons. It also requested the five nuclear-weapon States to take steps towards implementing these measures.
The Assembly then turned to draft resolution XXV on “Universal Declaration on the Achievement of a Nuclear-Weapon-Free-World”, by which the Assembly would invite States, agencies and organizations of the United Nations system and intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to disseminate the Declaration and to promote its implementation. By the text, the Secretary General would be requested to submit a report on the implementation of the Declaration to the General Assembly at its seventy-sixth session.
Prior to adopting the text as a whole, the Assembly decided to retain several paragraphs. By a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 20 against, with 25 abstentions, it decided to retain preambular paragraph 7 and noted the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. It also, by a recorded vote of 136 in favour to 3 against (France, United Kingdom, United States), with 35 abstentions, decided to retain preambular paragraph 9 and took into account the Secretary General’s new disarmament agenda. By a recorded vote of 138 in favour to 21 against, with 26 abstentions, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XXV as a whole.
Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XXVI on “Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free-Zone in Central Asia” and welcomed its entry into force in 2009, the signing of its protocol in 2014 by nuclear-weapon States and its ratification by four of these countries. By the draft’s provisions, the Assembly also called for early completion of the ratification process.
The Assembly then took up draft resolution XXVII on “Disarmament and non-proliferation education” (document A/C.1/73/L.49), deciding by a recorded vote of 171 in favour to none against, with 3 abstentions (Israel, Russian Federation, Syria), to retain operative paragraph 3, whereby it expressed its appreciation to the Secretary-General for his new disarmament agenda and noted the proposed actions therein to further advance disarmament and non-proliferation education. Adopting the draft as whole without a vote, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to prepare a report reviewing the results of the implementation of the recommendations and possible new opportunities for promoting disarmament and non-proliferation education, and to submit it to the General Assembly at its seventy-fifth session.
Next, the Assembly took up draft resolution XXVIII on “Decreasing the operational readiness of nuclear weapons systems” and first decided to retain preambular paragraph 8, by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 2 against (Russian Federation, United States), with 7 abstentions (France, India, Israel, Lithuania, Pakistan, Republic of Korea, United Kingdom). By its terms, the Assembly recalled the adoption by consensus of the conclusions and recommendations for follow-up actions by the 2010 Review Conference of the Parties to the Non-Proliferation Treaty, including the commitments of nuclear-weapon States to promptly engage in further reduction of the operational status of related systems in ways that promote international stability and security.
It then adopted draft resolution XXVIII as a whole, by a recorded vote of 175 in favour to 5 against (Comoros, France, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States), with 5 abstentions (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Israel, Lithuania, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Korea). By its terms, the Assembly called for practical and concrete steps to be taken, unilaterally, bilaterally or multilaterally, to decrease the operational readiness of nuclear weapons systems.
The Assembly then adopted, by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to none against, with 16 abstentions, draft resolution XXIX on “Implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on Their Destruction” and invited all States that have not signed the instrument to accede to it without delay. It further urged the one remaining State that has signed but not ratified the Ottawa Convention to ratify it.
It then turned to draft resolution XXX on “United action with renewed determination towards the total elimination of nuclear weapons”, holding separate recorded votes to retain 13 paragraphs. First the Assembly, by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 3 against (France, Russian Federation, South Africa), with 10 abstentions, decided to retain preambular paragraph 19, expressing deep concern at the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons use and reaffirmed the need for all States to comply at all times with applicable international law. By a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 2 against (France, Russian Federation), with 6 abstentions (China, Israel, Mali, Pakistan, Philippines, United States), it decided to retain preambular paragraph 20, recognizing that the catastrophic humanitarian consequences that would result from the use of nuclear weapons should be fully understood by all and noted in this regard that efforts should be made to increase such understanding.
The Assembly, by a recorded vote of 150 in favour to 5 against (Austria, Liechtenstein, New Zealand, South Africa, United States), with 21 abstentions, decided to retain operative paragraph 2 and reaffirmed the unequivocal undertaking of the nuclear-weapon States to fully implement the Non-Proliferation Treaty. By a recorded vote of 147 in favour to 8 against (Austria, Ireland, Liechtenstein, New Zealand, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, United States), with 22 abstentions, it decided to retain operative paragraph 3 and called upon all States parties to the Non-Proliferation Treaty to comply with their obligations. By a recorded vote of 175 in favour to 3 against (India, Israel, Pakistan), with 2 abstentions (Bhutan, United States), it decided to retain operative paragraph 5 and called upon all States not parties to the Non-Proliferation Treaty to accede as non-nuclear-weapon States promptly and without any conditions to achieve its universality.
By a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 3 against (France, Russian Federation, South Africa), with 10 abstentions, the Assembly decided to retain operative paragraph 7, thereby emphasizing that deep concerns about the humanitarian consequences of the use of nuclear weapons continue to be a key factor underpinning efforts by all States towards a nuclear-weapon-free world. It decided, by a recorded vote of 152 in favour to 1 against (France), with 26 abstentions, to retain operative paragraph 10 and stressed that increased transparency will build confidence and trust at the regional and international levels and contribute to establishing a common ground for dialogue and negotiation, which could allow further reductions in nuclear weapons towards their total elimination. By a recorded vote of 148 in favour to 2 against (France, South Africa), with 27 abstentions, it decided to retain operative paragraph 12 and called upon all States to make utmost efforts to ease international tensions, strengthen trust between States and improve the international security environment with a view to facilitating further nuclear reductions.
The Assembly, with 170 in favour to 3 against (China, France, Russian Federation), with 4 abstentions (Iran, Mali, Pakistan, Republic of Korea) decided to retain operative paragraph 13. By the text’s terms, it urged all States possessing nuclear weapons to continue to undertake all efforts necessary to comprehensively address the risks of unintended nuclear detonations. By a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 2 against (South Africa, United States), with 20 abstentions, it decided to retain operative paragraph 18, in which the Assembly acknowledged the widespread call for the early entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The Assembly urged all States to maintain all existing moratoria on nuclear-weapon test explosions or any other nuclear explosions and declare their political will to do so, so long as the Treaty has not entered into force. The Assembly, by a recorded vote of 174 in favour to 1 against (Pakistan), with 5 abstentions (Egypt, Iran, Israel, Thailand, Zimbabwe), decided to retain operative paragraph 20, by which it urged all States concerned to immediately commence negotiations on a treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices and its early conclusion.
It decided, by a recorded vote of 173 in favour to 2 against (China, Pakistan), with 4 abstentions (India, Israel, Myanmar, Thailand), it decided to retain operative paragraph 21, in which the Assembly urged all States concerned to declare and maintain a moratorium on the production of fissile material for use in nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, pending the entry into force of the treaty, and by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to none against, with 8 abstentions (Brazil, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Myanmar, Pakistan, Venezuela), to retain operative paragraph 31. By that provision, the Assembly stressed the fundamental role of IAEA safeguards and the importance of the universalization of the comprehensive safeguards agreements.
Voting on the draft resolution as a whole, with a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 4 against (China, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Syria), with 23 abstentions, the Assembly called upon all States to apply the principles of irreversibility, verifiability and transparency in the process of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation and to take further practical steps and effective measures towards the total elimination of nuclear weapons, based on the principle of undiminished and increased security for all.
The Assembly then took action on draft resolution XXXI on “Preventing and combating illicit brokering activities”. The Assembly first decided to retain, by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to none against, with 19 abstentions, preambular paragraph 9, recognizing the importance of States parties to the Arms Trade Treaty taking measures, pursuant to their national laws, to regulate brokering taking place under their jurisdiction. It then adopted the draft as a whole, by a recorded vote of 185 in favour to 1 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), with 2 abstentions (Egypt, Iran).
It then turned to draft resolution XXXII on “Follow-up to the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice on the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons”. Prior to approving that draft text as a whole, the Assembly held separate recorded votes to retain three paragraphs, deciding first to retain preambular paragraph 9, with 138 in favour to 2 against (France, United States), with 31 abstentions. By this provision, the Assembly noted continued efforts towards realizing nuclear disarmament, including through the Secretary General’s new disarmament agenda. The Assembly, by a recorded vote of 118 in favour to 35 against, with 20 abstentions, decided to retain preambular paragraph 17, welcoming the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, and, by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 35 against, with 18 abstentions, it decided to retain operative paragraph 2, calling once again upon all States to immediately engage in multilateral negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament in all its aspects under strict and effective international control, including under the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.
Adopting that draft as a whole by a recorded vote of 138 in favour to 32 against, with 17 abstentions, the Assembly underlined once again the unanimous conclusion of the Court that there exists an obligation to pursue in good faith and bring to a conclusion negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament in all its aspects under strict and effective international control.
By a recorded vote of 182 in favour to 1 against (Pakistan), with 5 abstentions (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Syria), the Assembly adopted draft resolution XXXIII on “Treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices” and urged the Conference on Disarmament to agree on and implement at its earliest opportunity a programme of work that includes the immediate commencement of negotiations on such an instrument on the basis of document CD/1299 and the mandate contained therein.
Without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XXXIV on “Preventing the acquisition by terrorists of radioactive sources” and urged Member States to take and strengthen national measures and capabilities, as appropriate, to prevent the acquisition and use by terrorists of radioactive sources as well as terrorist attacks on nuclear plants and facilities, and to suppress such acts.
Also without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XXXV on “Countering the threat posed by improvised explosive devices”. In doing so, it strongly encouraged States to develop and adopt their own national policy to counter improvised explosive devices that includes civilian-military cooperation, strengthen their countermeasure capability, prevent their territory from being used for terrorist purposes and to combat illegal armed groups, terrorists and other unauthorized recipients in their use of improvised explosive devices.
The Assembly then took up draft resolution XXXVI on “Ethical imperatives for a nuclear-weapons-free-world”. By the text, the Assembly would call upon all States to acknowledge the catastrophic humanitarian consequences and risks posed by a nuclear weapon detonation, whether by accident, miscalculation or design. The 193-member body would also acknowledge the ethical imperatives for nuclear disarmament and the urgency of achieving and maintaining a nuclear-weapon-free world, which is a “global public good of the highest order”, serving both national and collective security interests.
It first decided to retain preambular paragraph 11, by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 29 against, with 18 abstentions, recalling the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, in which the ethical imperatives for nuclear disarmament are acknowledged. Thereafter, it adopted the text as a whole, by a recorded vote of 136 in favour to 36 against, with 14 abstentions.
The Assembly then turned to draft resolution XXXVII on “The illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects”, with separate recorded votes on two paragraphs. By a recorded vote of 176 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 1 abstention (Solomon Islands), the Assembly decided to retain preambular paragraph 7, welcoming the successful conclusion of the third United Nations Conference to Review Progress Made in the Implementation of the Programme of Action on Small Arms. The Assembly, by a recorded vote of 176 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with no abstentions, decided to retain operative paragraph 6, by which it endorsed the outcome of this conference.
Without a vote, it then adopted the draft as whole. In doing so, the Assembly decided to convene a one-week biennial meeting of States in 2020 to consider key challenges and opportunities relating to the implementation of the Programme of Action on Small Arms and the International Tracing Instrument at the national, regional and global levels for the purposes of preventing and combating the diversion and the illicit international transfer of such weapons to unauthorized recipients, as well as a one-week meeting of States in 2022.
The Assembly then took up draft resolution XXXVIII on “Towards a nuclear-weapon-free world: accelerating the implementation of nuclear disarmament commitments”, first retaining several paragraphs. The Assembly, with 139 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 33 abstentions, decided to retain preambular paragraph 4, welcoming the launch of the Secretary-General’s new disarmament agenda. By a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 35 against, with 17 abstentions, it decided to retain preambular paragraph 12, welcoming the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.
Then the Assembly, by a recorded vote of 132 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 41 abstentions, decided to retain operative paragraph 13 and urged the co-sponsors of the 1995 resolution on the Middle East, adopted at the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference that year, to exert their utmost efforts with a view to ensuring the early establishment of a zone free of nuclear weapons and all other weapons of mass destruction, including through support for the convening of the conference on the establishment of such a zone.
By a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 4 against (India, Israel, Pakistan, United States), with 8 abstentions (Bhutan, France, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Monaco, Ukraine, United Kingdom), it decided to retain operative paragraph 15 and called upon all States parties to spare no effort to achieve the universality of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and in this regard urges India, Israel and Pakistan to accede to the instrument as non-nuclear-weapon States promptly and without conditions, and to place all their nuclear facilities under IAEA safeguards.
The Assembly, by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 36 against, with 15 abstentions, decided to retain operative paragraph 24. By its conditions, the Assembly called upon Member States to continue to support efforts to identify, elaborate, negotiate and implement further effective legally binding measures for nuclear disarmament and welcomed in this regard the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.
Voting on the draft resolution as a whole, with 139 in favour to 32 against, with 17 abstentions, the Assembly adopted the text. In doing so, it called upon nuclear-weapon States to fulfil their commitment to undertaking further efforts to reduce and ultimately eliminate all types of nuclear weapons, deployed and non-deployed, including through unilateral, bilateral, regional and multilateral measures. The Assembly also urged all States possessing nuclear weapons to decrease the operational readiness of these systems in a verifiable and transparent manner with a view to ensuring that all nuclear weapons are removed from high alert status.
By a recorded vote of 179 in favour to none against, with 5 abstentions (France, Israel, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States), the Assembly then adopted draft resolution XXXIX on “Fourth Conference of Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones and Mongolia, 2020”, by which it decided to convene it as a one-day conference at United Nations Headquarters in New York on 24 April 2020.
By a recorded vote of 180 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 1 abstention (Palau), the Assembly adopted draft resolution XL on “Transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities”. In doing so, it urged Member States to continue to submit information on the specific unilateral, bilateral, regional and multilateral transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities implemented in accordance with the recommendations contained in the report of the Group of Governmental Experts.
By adopting by a recorded vote draft decision I on “Missiles”, with 174 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 7 abstentions (Australia, Fiji, Haiti, Honduras, Japan, Palau, Tonga), the Assembly decided to include that item in the provisional agenda of its seventy-fifth session.
Subsequently, it adopted draft decision II on “Nuclear disarmament verification”, deciding, by a recorded vote of 181 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions (Iran, Syria), to include the topic in the provisional agenda of its seventy-fourth session, under the item “General and complete disarmament” and the sub-item “Nuclear disarmament verification”.
Next, the Assembly took up the report “Review and implementation of the Concluding Document of the Twelfth Special Session of the General Assembly” (document A/73/511), which contained eight draft resolutions.
Acting without a vote, it adopted draft resolution I on “United Nations disarmament fellowship, training and advisory services”, by which the Assembly noted with satisfaction that the programme has trained a large number of officials from Member States throughout its 40 years of existence, many of whom hold positions of responsibility in the field of disarmament within their own Governments.
By a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 50 against, with 13 abstentions, it adopted draft resolution II on “Convention on the Prohibition of the Use of Nuclear Weapons”, by which it reiterated its request to the Conference on Disarmament to commence negotiations to reach agreement on an international convention prohibiting the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons under any circumstances.
Acting without a vote, it adopted draft resolution III titled “United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa”, by which, among other things, the Assembly urged all States, as well as international, governmental and non-governmental organizations and foundations, to make voluntary contributions to enable the Regional Centre to carry out its programmes and activities and meet the needs of African States.
The Assembly, without a vote, adopted draft resolution IV titled “United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean” (document A/C.1/73/L.56), by which the Assembly welcomed the activities carried out in the past year and requested the Centre to continue to take into account the proposals to be submitted by the countries of the region for the implementation of its mandate in the areas of peace, disarmament and development.
Again without a vote, it adopted draft resolution V titled “United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific”. By the provisions of the draft, the Assembly expressed its satisfaction at the activities carried out over the past year and invited all States of the region to continue to support its activities.
The Assembly adopted, without a vote, draft resolution VI on “Regional confidence-building measures: activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa”. In doing so, it reaffirmed its support for efforts aimed at promoting confidence-building measures at regional and subregional levels in order to ease tensions and conflicts in the region and to further sustainable peace, stability and development in the subregion.
Once again without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution VII titled “United Nations Disarmament Information Programme”, by which it recommended that the Programme continue to inform, educate and generate public understanding of the importance of multilateral action and support for it, including action by the United Nations and the Conference on Disarmament, in the field of arms control and disarmament, in a factual, balanced and objective manner.
Without a vote, it then adopted draft resolution VIII titled “United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament”. By its provisions, the Assembly commended the three regional centres for peace and disarmament for their sustained support to Member States over the past 30 years in implementing disarmament, arms control and non-proliferation activities through seminars and conferences, capacity-building and training, policy and technical expertise, and information and advocacy at the global, regional and national levels.
Moving along, the Assembly took up the report “Review of the implementation of the recommendations and decisions adopted by the General Assembly at its tenth special session” (document A/73/512), containing two draft resolutions. Without a vote, the Assembly adopted both draft resolution I on “Report of the Conference on Disarmament” and draft resolution II on “Report of the Disarmament Commission”.
The Assembly then took up the report “The risk of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East” (document A/73/513), containing one draft resolution and one draft decision. First, it took up the draft resolution “The risk of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East”. Prior to approving it as a whole, the Assembly held a separate recorded vote on two paragraphs. By a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 3 against (India, Israel, Pakistan), with 4 abstentions (Bhutan, France, Georgia, United States), the Assembly decided to retain preambular paragraph 5, emphasizing the need for appropriate measures on the question of the prohibition of military attacks on nuclear facilities.
By a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 3 against (India, Israel, Pakistan), with 4 abstentions (Bhutan, France, Georgia, United States), it decided to retain preambular paragraph 6, bearing in mind the consensus reached by the General Assembly since its thirty-fifth session that the establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the region of the Middle East would greatly enhance international peace and security.
By a recorded vote of 176 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 1 abstention (Ukraine), it decided to retain preambular paragraph 7, by which the Assembly recalled the resolution on the Middle East adopted by the 1995 Review and Extension Conference of the Parties to the Treaty, in which the Conference noted with concern the continued existence in the Middle East of unsafeguarded nuclear facilities, reaffirmed the importance of the early realization of universal adherence to the Treaty, and called upon all States in the Middle East that had not yet done so, without exception, to accede to the Treaty as soon as possible and to place all their nuclear facilities under full-scope Agency safeguards.
By a recorded vote of 158 in favour to 6 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 21 abstentions, the Assembly adopted the draft as a whole. By its provisions, the Assembly reiterated that the 1995 resolution on the Middle East adopted by the 1995 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference remains valid until its goals and objectives are achieved. The Assembly also called for immediate steps towards the full implementation of that resolution.
It then deferred action on the draft decision “Convening a Conference on the Establishment of a Middle East Zone Free of Nuclear Weapons and other Weapons of Mass Destruction” (document A/C.1/73/L.22/Rev.1) to allow more time to review budget implications of the decision. The decision would have the Assembly entrust to the Secretary-General the convening, no later than June 2019, of a conference on the establishment of a Middle East zone free of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, to which all States of the region, the three co-sponsors of the 1995 resolution on the Middle East adopted by the 1995 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, the other two nuclear-weapon States and the relevant international organizations shall be invited.
The Assembly then turned to the report “Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects” (document A/73/514), adopting, without a vote, an eponymous draft resolution contained therein. In doing so, the Assembly called upon all States that have not yet done so to take all measures to become parties, as soon as possible, to the Convention and its protocols. It also noted that conferences may be convened to examine amendments to the instrument or to any of the protocols.
Turning to the report “Strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region” (document A/73/515), the Assembly considered an eponymous draft resolution contained therein.
The representative of Iran, explaining his delegation’s position, said that while he would vote in favour of operative paragraphs 2 and 5, he would not participate in the action on the draft as a whole.
Prior to taking up the draft as a whole, the Assembly decided, by recorded vote, to retain two paragraphs. By a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 3 abstentions (Fiji, Togo, Tuvalu), it decided to retain operative paragraph 2. In doing so, it expressed its satisfaction at the continuing efforts by Mediterranean countries to contribute actively to the elimination of all causes of tension in the region and to the promotion of just and lasting solutions to the persistent problems of the region through peaceful means, thus ensuring the withdrawal of foreign forces of occupation and respecting the sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of all countries of the region and the right of peoples to self-determination. It also called for full adherence to the principles of non-interference, non-intervention, non-use of force or threat of use of force and the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by force, in accordance with the Charter and the relevant resolutions of the United Nations.
By a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 3 abstentions (Fiji, France, Tuvalu), the Assembly decided to retain operative paragraph 5, which would have the Assembly call upon all States of the Mediterranean region that have not yet done so to adhere to all the multilaterally negotiated legal instruments in force related to the field of disarmament and non-proliferation, thus creating the conditions necessary for strengthening peace and cooperation in the region. By a recorded vote of 181 in favour, to none against, with 2 abstentions (Israel, United States), it then adopted the draft as a whole, reaffirming that security in the Mediterranean is closely linked to European security as well as to international peace and security.
Turning to the report “Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty” (document A/73/516), containing an eponymous draft resolution, the Assembly decided, by recorded vote, to retain two paragraphs of that draft. It decided, by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to none against, with 11 abstentions, to retain preambular paragraph 4, stressing the vital importance and urgency of achieving the entry into force of the Treaty and affirming its resolute determination, 22 years after the Treaty was opened for signature, to achieve its entry into force. The Assembly also, by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to none against, with 7 abstentions (Egypt, India, Israel, Mauritius, Pakistan, Syria, United States), decided to retain preambular paragraph 7, recalling the adoption by consensus of the conclusions and recommendations for follow-up actions of the 2010 Review Conference of the Parties to the Non-Proliferation Treaty, which reaffirmed the vital importance of the entry into force of the Test-Ban Treaty as a core element of the international nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime.
By a recorded vote of 183 in favour, to 1 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), with 4 abstentions (India, Mauritius, Syria, United States) the Assembly adopted the draft as a whole. In doing so, the Assembly condemned in the strongest terms the six nuclear tests conducted by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea since 2006 in violation of relevant Security Council resolutions and urged full compliance with the obligations under those resolutions.
It then took up the report “Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction” (document A/73/517), containing an eponymous draft resolution, which it adopted without a vote. By the terms of the text, the Assembly took note of the consensus outcome of and the decisions on all provisions of the Convention reached at the eighth Review Conference of the States Parties to the Convention. The Assembly also called upon States parties to participate and actively engage in the instrument’s continued implementation.
The Assembly then considered the report “Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly” (document A/73/518), which contained the draft decision on “Provisional programme of work and timetable of the First Committee for 2019”. The Assembly adopted it without a vote.
The Assembly then turned to the report “Programme planning” (document A/73/519), which contained no draft resolutions.

Source: United Nations